Jose Alvarez, “Surfaces of Constant Simultaneity”

thumbnailJose Alvarez will guide us through his own personal journey of investigation into the realms of consciousness, mysticism, spirituality, magic, shamanism, space exploration, and paranormal phenomena. Utilizing the concept in theoretical astrophysics of parallel universes and space as a continuum membrane with no beginning or end, Alvarez will place his cast of characters as a stand-in for the strong human desire for knowledge and transformation and his continued visual inquiry into the realms of the fantastic and the philosophical.

Jose Alvarez began his career by making a name for himself through charismatic performances where he “channeled” the 2,000-year-old spirit of a shaman named Carlos. In front of live audiences around the world, Carlos’ performances and media broadcasts have been viewed by millions of people in the United States, China, Australia, Europe, and South America. These performances were the subject of a video work presented in the 2002 Whitney Biennial curated by Lawrence Rinder, and more recently at his solo exhibition at The Kitchen in New York curated by Debra Singer. He has performed at the NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, as well at the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia.

Currently based in South Florida, Jose Alvarez was born in 1968 in New York. He attended the School of Visual Arts. Alvarez has also exhibited his work, most recently at Marlborough Gallery, New York, The Moore Space, Miami, Gavlak, West Palm Beach, Ratio 3, San Francisco, as well as in the 2002 Whitney Biennial, “We Are Electric,” at Jeffrey Deitch, and “Cosmic Wonder” at the Yerba Buena Center for The Arts. Alvarez’s work will be included in the upcoming exhibition“Altered States” at The Norton Museum of Art in Palm Beach and was included in the exhibition “Psychedelic: Optical and
Visionary Art since the 1960s” at the San Antonio Museum of Art.

The ATC series is produced by the Berkeley Center for New Media (BCNM) with support from CITRIS, and the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive.