HTNM Symposium — Technology, Space, Reason: Infrastructures of Knowledge in the Anthropocene with Paul Edwards

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——-HTNM REVISITED 12/7 PANEL VIDEO NOW ONLINE——–


Pleased to finally be able to share the video of the amazing October 14th panel on “Technology, Space, Reason: Infrastructures of Knowledge in the Anthropocene,” featuring Bernard Stiegler, Paul Edwards, and Jenna Burrell, moderated by David Bates. Watch it online today!



This event was co-sponsored by the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Dean of Humanities, and the Rhetoric Department.


——-HTNM REVISITED 11/17 PAUL EDWARDS VIDEO NOW ONLINE——–


Missed the History and Theory of New Media lecture “Technology, Space and Reason: Infrastructures of Knowledge in the Anthropocene” with Paul Edwards?


The video is now online for viewing!



View on YouTube here


The History and Theory of New Media Lecture Series brings to campus leading humanities scholars working on issues of media transition and technological emergence. The series promotes new, interdisciplinary approaches to questions about the uses, meanings, causes, and effects of rapid or dramatic shifts in techno-infrastructure, information management, and forms of mediated expression. Presented by the Berkeley Center for New Media, these events are free and open to the public.

For more information, visit: http://htnm-berkeley.com


——-HTNM REVISITED 10/18——–


Technology, Space, Reason: Infrastructures of Knowledge in the Anthropocene continued on Friday, October 14th with Paul Edwards offering insights into the impact of humans on the climate in a lecture, followed by a panel on the Anthropocene, featuring Paul Edwards, Bernard Stiegler, and Jenna Burrell, moderated by David Bates.


Paul began his talk with a detailed examination of the physical impact humans have made on the planet, situating the anthropocene in terms of climate change. He then investigated how knowledge infrastructures are currently able to (or unable to) monitor, model, and visualize the technosphere’s role in the planet’s metabolism of energy, materials, and information (including waste!). While the results Paul pointed to were indeed sobering, he offered a hopeful account of ways in which humans can refashion their role. Using logistics as a model to close the loop between the technosphere and the biosphere, Paul suggested several developments already in the field, such as carbon counting. However, he also noted how metrics in many of these areas are incredibly flawed — buying a Prius, for example, in a coal-producing area of the country, actually expends more energy than buying a traditional car. In order to use logistics to alter human behavior, we need to have fuller models. Surprisingly, Paul saw the greatest hope for the future in large industries. He suggested that many of these companies are beginning to shift their environmental practices and that since they have the scale to affect real change, we could see real innovative solutions from these sectors.


The panel discussion was a great opportunity for audience members to delve further into these topics, with questions ranging from the nitty gritty of the data modeling to the wide-ranging of the role of educators in the anthropocene.


Thank you to the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Dean of Arts and Humanities, the Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society, and the Rhetoric Department for such an intellectually inspiring event.


For information on Bernard Stiegler’s talk, read Miyoko Conley’s report.


And check out our photo’s below!


2016 HTNM: Edwards


The History and Theory of New Media Lecture Series brings to campus leading humanities scholars working on issues of media transition and technological emergence. The series promotes new, interdisciplinary approaches to questions about the uses, meanings, causes, and effects of rapid or dramatic shifts in techno-infrastructure, information management, and forms of mediated expression. Presented by the Berkeley Center for New Media, these events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit: http://htnm-berkeley.com


——-HTNM ORIGINAL EVENT——–


The digital epoch has destroyed many traditional institutional knowledge practices while transforming and inventing a plethora of others. What is at stake in the current reconfiguration of knowledge in the 21st century? That question must be posed in planetary terms. The digital infrastructure of knowledge is a new spatial, political, and cultural form of reason that must be grasped in its broadest form. The planet itself — fully entangled in the Anthropocene with human technologies, human reason – appears throughout the topologies and topographies of these new infrastructures of knowledge.


049yPUEDPaul Edwards continues the symposium with a keynote on Friday. Edwards is a professor at the School of Information and Department of History at the University of Michigan. His research explores the history, politics, and cultural aspects of computers, information infrastructures, and global climate science. The symposium will highlight how to build better knowledge infrastructures for the Anthropocene epoch. Edwards is the co-editor (with Geoffrey C. Bowker) of the Infrastructures book series (MIT Press), and serves on the editorial boards of Big Data & Society: Critical Interdisciplinary Inquiries, Information & Culture: A Journal of History, and Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture, and Society. His most recent book is A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (MIT Press, 2010).



Symposium Schedule


Thursday, Oct. 13, 5 pm. Geballe Room, Townsend Center for the Humanities
****Bernard Stiegler, Centre de recherche et d’innovation, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris


Friday, Oct. 14, 1.30 pm. Banatao Auditorium, Sudartja Dai Hall
****Paul N. Edwards, University of Michigan


Friday, Oct. 14, 3.30 pm. Banatao Auditorium, Sudartja Dai Hall
****Speaker Panel with Bernard Stiegler, Paul Edwards, Jenna Burrell, and David Bates


Sponsored by the Townsend Center, the Dean of Humanities, the Berkeley Center for New Media, and the Department of Rhetoric.