ATC Lecture — Maya Lin, “What Is Missing?”

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We’ve been getting a lot of requests for video from Maya Lin’s great Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium lecture “What is Missing?”, so we’re thrilled to now be able to share her talk with you.

Maya Lin’s work encompasses large-scale environmental installations, intimate studio artworks, architectural works, and memorials. She discusses her body of work focused on a profound respect and love for the natural environment along with her final memorial, the What is Missing? project, which asks viewers to reconsider nature and the environment at a time when it is crucial to do so. We were particularly interested in how Maya uses data and abstracts the information to create moving and provocative pieces.

And don’t miss out on Caroline Woolard’s upcoming lecture “What is a Work of Art in the Age of $120,000 Degrees?” on January 26th, at 7:30pm!

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The Berkeley Center for New Media, the Arts Research Center, and the David Brower Center teamed up again for the Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium’s “What is Missing?” with Maya Lin on September 29, 2014.

Maya Lin described the currents of her art to an overflowing crowd, charting her interest in data and time through her many sculptures, memorials, and architectural designs. She emphasized her interest in using data to offer us new insight into our surroundings — from pin works representing rivers, to wire structures of landscapes. Her most recent and final memorial is “What is Missing?” — an iterative work that “dememorializes the memorial.” Both web-based and situated physically in a variety of sculptures and installation works, “What is Missing?” asks both what we are losing as a result of the human impact on the environment, and what we could do to change this decline in diversity. An optimist at heart, Maya believes in the great resilience of our environment, if we allow it the time and space to change. Her work, which offers glimpses of what we are losing, seeks to make the connections between our actions and the environmental result, as a call for change.

Check out our photos below and some of the highlights of her talk.

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* Please accept our apologies! Due to the overwhelming popularity of this event, the RSVP list is completely full. Those on the list will be given priority seating until 7pm. After that we will admit anyone waiting in line on a seat-available basis. For those that cannot attend, the video will be posted online two weeks after the lecture. *

Maya Lin’s work encompasses large-scale environmental installations, intimate studio artworks, architectural works, and memorials. She will discuss her body of work focused on a profound respect and love for the natural environment along with her final memorial, the What is Missing? project, which asks viewers to reconsider nature and the environment at a time when it is crucial to do so. The talk will be followed by a short Q&A and attendees will be invited to add their own environmental memories to the What is Missing? archive in the Brower Center gallery.

Maya Lin is currently working on what is her final memorial, What is Missing? which focuses on bringing awareness to the current crisis surrounding biodiversity and habitat loss.

Maya Lin has maintained a careful balance between art and architecture throughout her career, creating a remarkable body of work that includes large-scale site-specific installations, intimate studio artworks, architectural works and memorials. Landscape is the context and the source of inspiration for Ms. Lin’s art. She peers curiously at the landscape through a twenty-first century lens, merging rational and technological order with notions of beauty and the transcendental. Utilizing technological methods to study and visualize the natural world, Ms. Lin takes micro and macro views of the earth, sonar resonance scans, aerial and satellite mapping devices and translates that information into sculptures, drawings and environmental installations. Her works address how we relate and respond to the environment, and presents new ways of looking at the world around us. From recent environmental works such as Storm King Wavefield, Where the Land Meets the Sea and Eleven Minute Line to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, where she cut open the land and polished its edges to create a history embedded in the earth, Ms. Lin has consistently explored how we experience the landscape. She has made works that merge completely with the terrain, blurring the boundaries between two- and three-dimensional space and set up a systematic ordering of the land tied to history, language, and time.

Her studio artwork has been shown in solo and group museum exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad. Ms. Lin’s current exhibition Maya Lin: Systematic Landscapes originated at Henry Art Gallery in Seattle and is the first to translate the scale and immersive capacity of her outdoor installations to the interior space of a museum. Maya Lin: Three Ways of Looking at the Earth, Selections from Systematic Landscapes was shown most recently at The Pace Gallery (formerly PaceWildenstein) in September 2009. Ms. Lin is represented by The Pace Gallery in New York City.

Tickets are available online and at the door. Ticketed attendees will be admitted on a first come, first served basis.

Berkeley’s Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium is an internationally recognized forum for presenting new ideas that challenge conventional wisdom about art, technology, and culture. This series, free of charge and open to the public, presents artists, writers, curators, and scholars who consider contemporary issues at the intersection of aesthetic expression, emerging technologies, and cultural history, from a critical perspective.

For the first time ever, the 2014/15 lecture series will be co-presented by the Arts Research Center, the Berkeley Center for New Media, and The David Brower Center, and will focus on the legacy of the Free Speech Movement here on the Berkeley Campus. All lectures will take place at The David Brower Center from 7:30-9:00pm.