Events
Special Events

Grad Chat: Advice on the Academic Job Market from Berkeley Alums

Special Events
09 Nov, 2021

Grad Chat: Advice on the Academic Job Market from Berkeley Alums

Fearturing
Margaret Rhee, Assistant Professor in the Department of Media Study at SUNY Buffalo
Reginold Royston, Assistant Professor of New Media and African Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Ryan Shaw, Associate Professor and Undergraduate Program Coordinator at the UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS)

Moderated by Clancy Wilmott, Assistant Professor in Critical Cartography, Geovisualisation and Design in the Berkeley Center for New Media and the Department of Geography

Presented as a part of BCNM’s Grad Chats, a series focused on navigating the academic job market and career development with UC Berkeley grads.

Register here!

BCNM hosts our second academic Grad Chat, a conversation series focused on navigating the academic job market and career development with UC Berkeley grads. This time, we're featuring three BCNM D.E. grads: Margaret Rhee (Ethnic Studies/New Media), Reginold Royston (African Diaspora Studies/New Media), and Ryan Shaw (School of Information/New Media). Moderated by Assistant Professor of Film & Media and BCNM Executive Committee Member Clancy Wilmott, Assistant Professor in Critical Cartography, Geovisualisation and Design. This will be hosted as a Zoom meeting rather than a webinar, and students will have the opportunity to directly ask the panel questions. Grad Chats are focused on addressing graduate students' questions but are also open to undergraduate students.

About Margaret Rhee

Margaret Rhee is a poet, scholar, and new media artist. Her debut poetry collection Love, Robot, named a 2017 Best Book of Poetry by Entropy Magazine and awarded a 2018 Elgin Award by the Science Fiction Poetry Association and the 2019 Best Book Award in Poetry by the Asian American Studies Association. Her poetry chapbooks include Yellow and Radio Heart; or, How Robots Fall Out of Love. Her book manuscripts Poetry Machines: Letters to Future Readers and How We Became Human: Race, Robots, and the Asian American Body are currently under review at Duke University Press.

Prior to the University at Buffalo, she taught at the University of Oregon in Gender and Women Studies, and as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Film and Television and Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. From 2018 - 2019, she was a College Fellow in Digital Practice in the English Department at Harvard University and currently is a member of MetaLab @ Harvard and an editorial board member of --empyre-- a global community of new media artists, curators, theorists, producers, and community members (Cornell University).

She received her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in ethnic studies with a designated emphasis in new media studies. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Media Study at SUNY Buffalo and the recipient of the Diversity Faculty Fellowship, SUNY wide competition.

She also currently co-leads Palah 파랗 Light Lab, a creative space that fosters poetry, participation, and pedagogy through technology and equity.

About Reginold Royston

Reginold Royston, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of New Media and African Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His work examines technoculture in Ghana and the role of the diaspora in the African mediascape, including viral dance-music, podcasting, and tech entrepreneurship. He teaches courses on race, class and gender in the tech industry at Wisconsin’s School of Computer, Data and Information Sciences, and is currently working on a manuscript about the impact of digital media on Ghanaian national identity. Dr. Royston also is a member of the AI4Afrika network. @raroyston

About Ryan Shaw

Ryan Shaw is Associate Professor and Director of the undergraduate program at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he teaches courses on the foundations, theory, and practice of information science and information organization. Research-wise, he is interested in how information technologies are used to conceptualize and model our worlds and pasts. He is a member of ORG.

Accessibility

BCNM events are free and open to the public. All of our events for the Fall 2021 academic semester will be held on Zoom in English, in Pacific Standard Time (PST). We provide live-captioning in Zoom and offer a separate Streamtext window for live-captioning with options to customize text size and display. We strive to meet any additional access and accommodation needs. Please contact info.bcnm [at] berkeley.edu with requests or questions.

BCNM is proud to make conversations with leading scholars, artists, and technologists freely available to the public. Please help us continue this tradition by making a tax-deductible donation today. If you are in the position to support the program, we suggest $5 per event, or $100 a year.

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