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Fall 2015 Courses

Fall 2015

Graduate Courses

NWMEDIA 201, 3 units
Questioning New Media
Staff

New Media 201 meets weekly and is held in conjunction with the Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium, a monthly lecture series which brings internationally-known speakers to campus to present their work on advanced topics in new media. Students will enhance skills in how to think critically about advanced topics in new media, how to formulate incisive questions about new media, and how to evaluate and create effective presentations on topics in new media.
JILL MILLER is an art practitioner who works collaboratively with communities and individuals. Her recent work explores motherhood through a lens of feminism and performance, and her work takes shape across many forms and disciplines. In past work she searched for Bigfoot in the Sierra Nevada, inserted herself into the art historical work of John Baldessari, and became a private investigator who performed surveillance on art collectors. Born in Illinois, she received her MFA in from University of California, Los Angeles and her BA from University of California, Berkeley, in English. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, and collected in public institutions worldwide including CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo in Madrid and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. She teaches at UC Berkeley, Stanford University and San Francisco Art Institute.

NWMEDIA 290-1, 4 units
Theorizing Popular Culture and Social Media
A.De Kosnik

This seminar is designed to give graduate students in the arts and humanities fundamental knowledge of the “canonical” scholarly literature of cultural studies, media studies, new media studies, and performance studies specifically as it pertains to popular practices, including television, music (pop, rock, and hip-hop), mainstream cinema, video games, social media (YouTube, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, etc.), original online content, and fan and piracy cultures. We will be especially attentive to issues of race/ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and transnationalism. (also listed as THEATER 266).

NWMEDIA 290-2, 4 units
Critical Practices: people places participation
E. Paulos and J. Miller

A hands-on, studio design course where students work at the intersection of technological innovation and socially engaged art. Students will integrate a suite of digital fabrication tools with social design methods to create work that engages in cultural critique. Working with innovative technologies and radical, new art practices, this course will explore: hybrid art forms, critical design for community engagement, interventions in public spaces, tactical media and disobedient objects. These new making strategies will reframe our notions of people, places and participation.

NWMEDIA 290-3, 4 units
Archive, Install, Restore
S. Lie

Through hands-on creative practice, this graduate seminar will examine and revive technologies associated with early computing and network culture. In preparation for an exhibition on electronic literature, students will build concrete prototypes of interactive displays, design user flows through the exhibition space, and develop a print catalog to accompany the exhibition. Through the creative restoration of Hercules graphics cards and dot matrix printers, students will explore roads not taken in the history of interface design. Contemporary practices and platforms will also be deployed to bring the aesthetic and conceptual concerns of early practitioners into focus, from the structure of knowledge to the material interface of the written word.

ART 218-1, 4 units
Theory and Criticism
S. Syjuco

Weekly meetings will provide a forum for the discussion of issues related to assigned readings in the fields of esthetics, theory and art criticism.

CY PLAN C241, 4 units
Research Methods in Environmental Design
P.C. Bosselmann

The components, structure, and meaning of the urban environment. Environmental problems, attitudes, and criteria. Environmental survey, analysis, and interview techniques. Methods of addressing environmental quality. Environmental simulation.

INFO 213-001, 4 units
User Interface Design and Development
T. Parikh

User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.

INFO 237, 3 units
Intellectual Property Law for the Information Industries
Staff

This class is about the philosophical, legal, historical, and economic analysis of the need for and uses of laws protecting intellectual property. Topics include types of intellectual property (copyright, patent, trade secrecy), the interaction between law and technology, various approaches (including compulsory licensing), and the relationship between intellectual property and compatibility standards.

INFO 290-001, 2 units
Society, Network, and Social Networks
P. Duguid

INFO 290A-1, 1 unit
Information Technology and Identity:
The Future of Storytelling
Q. R. Hardy

Mass communications technologies have been profound influencers of human identity, from the printing press and the rise of vernacular political cultures to television and the power of celebrity. While the Web is still a work in progress, salient characteristics such as the collapse of distance, the discovery of like-minded groups, and information delivered in short bursts are already affecting the way people see themselves and the way they consume information. Following an overview on the relationship of technology with identity and communications, the course will look at the uses of narrative in news, public relations, advertising, entertainment, and online gaming.

INFO 290A-3, 1 unit
Socia Data Revolution
A.S. Weigend

Free communication has changed the world, including the expectations and work and play. The class begins with the two data revolutions–the first about passively collected clicks on the web, the second about actively contributed data, as platforms like Facebook empower individuals to contribute a variety of quantitative and qualitative data (transactions, social relations, attention gestures, intention, location, and more.) With active student participation, we explore the far-reaching implications of the consumer data revolution for individuals, communities, business, and society.

INFO 296A-1, 2-4 unit
Information Access
M.K. Buckland

The seminar explores selected advanced topics relating to ‘digital libraries’ with special emphasis on: Access to networked resources, use of two or more resources in conjunction, combined use of two or more retrieval systems (e.g. use of pre- or post-processing to enhance the capabilities), and the redesign of library services.  It is expected that these issues will require attention to a number of questions about the nature of information retrieval processes, the feasibility of not-yet-conventional techniques, techniques of making different systems work together, social impact, and the reconsideration of past practices. More generally, the seminar is intended to provide a forum for advanced students in the School. Anyone interested in these topics is welcome to join in — and to talk about their own work. This is a continuation of the previous Lynch/Buckland seminars.

MUSIC 201A 1, 4 units
Proseminar in Computer Music
E. Campion

Overview of the field of computer music and its application to music composition. Practices, procedures, and aesthetics related to the application of newer technologies to music composition will be covered in tandem with contemporary research topics in computer music. Recent computer music repertoire with its related technologies will be examined. Students in this proseminar must have advanced musical training and knowledge of the history and repertoire of electro-acoustic music.

RHETORIC 250, 4 units
Rhetoric of the Image
M. J. Mascuch

A study of the visual image as a mode of discourse, together with an analysis of the terms in which images have been interpreted and criticized. Focus may be on the rhetoric of a particular image or set of images, or on more broadly theoretical writings about image.

Undergraduate courses:

NWMEDIA 190-001, 4 units
Critical Practices: people places participation
E. Paulos and J. Miller

A hands-on, studio design course where students work at the intersection of technological innovation and socially engaged art. Students will integrate digital fabrication tools with social design methods to create work that engages in cultural critique. Working with innovative technologies and radical, new art practices, this course will explore: hybrid art forms, critical design for community engagement, interventions in public spaces, tactical media and disobedient objects. Hands on building, making, imagining and experimenting required!

NWMEDIA 190-2, 4 units
Archive, Install, Restore
S. Lie

Through hands-on creative practice, this graduate seminar will examine and revive technologies associated with early computing and network culture. In preparation for an exhibition on electronic literature, students will build concrete prototypes of interactive displays, design user flows through the exhibition space, and develop a print catalog to accompany the exhibition. Through the creative restoration of Hercules graphics cards and dot matrix printers, students will explore roads not taken in the history of interface design. Contemporary practices and platforms will also be deployed to bring the aesthetic and conceptual concerns of early practitioners into focus, from the structure of knowledge to the material interface of the written word.

AFRICAM C134, 4 units
Information Technology and Society
M. S. Laguerre

This course assesses the role of information technology in the digitalization of society by focusing on the deployment of e-government, e-commerce, e-learning, the digital city, telecommuting, virtual communities, internet time, the virtual office, and the geography of cyber space. The course will also discuss the role of information technology in the governance and economic development of society

ART 21 1, 4 units
Digital Photography: The Image and the Hive Mind
A. Desouza

Topics include image capture, composition, image syntax, image analysis, image manipulation, metatext production, and image sequencing for visual narratives. We also study image dissemination through online networks including social networks, blogs, news, storage, search, and print services. Rather than limiting the discussion of photography to the production of the photographic image itself, we explore in written assignments how the reception of images can change based on context, usage, and network dynamics.

ART 26, 4 units
Moving Image Media Production
G. Niemeyer

This course provides students with the technological and conceptual groundwork for advanced courses in video art and filmmaking including the use of digital cameras, sound recording, basic lighting techniques, digital editing, compression, and online dissemination. We will focus on what makes compelling moving images that elicit powerful intellectual and emotional responses. The course also explores the range of techniques and languages of creative video making from traditional story genres to more contemporary experimental forms.

ART 163, 4 units
Social Practice: The Artist in Body and Site
S. Syjuco

Social Practice broadly refers to work produced through various forms of direct engagement with a site, social system or collaborator. Interdisciplinary in nature, such work often takes the form of guerilla interventions, performance, institutional critique, community based public art and political activity, all sharing the premise that art created in the public sphere can help alter public perception and work toward social transformation.

ART 171, 4 units
Digital Video: The Architecture of Time
Staff

This hands-on studio course is designed to present students with a foundation-level introduction to the skills, theories and concepts used in digital video production. Non-linear and non-destructive editing methods used in digital video are defining new “architectures of time” for cinematic creation and experience, and offer new and innovative possibilities for authoring new forms of the moving image. This course will expose students to a broad range of industry standard equipment, film and video history, theory, terminology, field and post-production skills. Students will be required to technically master the digital media tools introduced in the course. Each week will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstration of examples, and studio time for training and working on student assignments.

Bioengineering C125, 4 units
(Also Electrical Engineering C125)
Introduction to Robotics
R. Bajcsy

An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobean, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection. The course concludes with current applications of robotics in active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.

COMPSCI 10-001, 4 units
The Beauty and Joy of Computing
Staff

This course is an introduction to the beauty and joy of computing, including the history, social implications, great principles, and future of computing. Beautiful applications that have changed the way we look at the world, how computing empowers discovery and progress in other fields, and the relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized. Students will learn the joy of programming a computer using a friendly, graphical language, and will complete a substantial team programming project related to their interests.

COMPSCI 98 2, 2 units
Gamecrafters
D. Garcia

COMPSCI 160 1-4 units
User Interface Design and Development
Staff

This course looks at the design, implementation, and evaluation of user interfaces. It focuses on user-centered design and task analytics, conceptual models and interface metaphors, usability inspection and evaluation methods. We will also perform analysis of user study data, input methods (keyboard, pointing, touch, tangible) and input models. The course will investigate visual design principles, interface prototyping and implementation methodologies and tools. Students will develop a user interface for a specific task and target user group in teams.

COMPSCI 184-001, 4 units
Foundations of Computer Graphics
Staff

This course is an introduction to the foundations of 3-dimensional computer graphics. Topics covered include 2D and 3D transformations, interactive 3D graphics programming with OpenGL, shading and lighting models, geometric modeling using Bézier and B-Spline curves, computer graphics rendering including ray tracing and global illumination, signal processing for anti-aliasing and texture mapping, and animation and inverse kinematics. There will be an emphasis on both the mathematical and geometric aspects of graphics, as well as the ability to write complete 3D graphics programs.

COMPSCI 188-001, 4 units
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
S. J. Russell

Basic ideas and techniques underlying the design of intelligent computer systems. Topics include heuristic search, problem solving, game playing, knowledge representation, logical inference, planning, reasoning under uncertainty, expert systems, learning, perception, language understanding.

COMPSCI 195 1, 1 unit
Social Implications of Computer Technology
J.S. Denero

Topics include electronic community; the changing nature of work; technological risks; the information economy; intellectual property; privacy; artificial intelligence and the sense of self; pornography and censorship; professional ethics. Students will lead discussions on additional topics.

IEOR 115, 3 units
Industrial and Commercial Data Systems
K. Y. Goldberg

Design and implementation of databases, with an emphasis on industrial and commercial applications. Relational algebra, SQL, normalization. Students work in teams with local companies on a database design project. WWW design and queries.

MUSIC 109, 4 units
Music Cognition: The Mind Behind the Musical Ear
J. Bamberger

The goal of this class is to interrogate and make explicit the powerful musical intuitions that are at work as you make sense of the music all around you. What is the nature of the knowledge that is guiding these intuitions? How does this knowledge develop in ordinary and extraordinary ways? To approach these questions, small composition-like projects aided by a specially designed computer music environment will function as a workplace.

RHETORIC 119-001, 4 units
Rhetorical Places
W. W. Wong

Studies in the history and theory of the rhetorics of place, space, and sites.

RHETORIC 114-001, 4 units
Rhetoric of New Media
F.R. Guttierrez

This course examines a range of digital media practices including hypertext, interactive drama, videogames, literary interactive fiction, and socially constructed narratives in multi-user spaces. Through a mixture of readings, discussion, and project work, we will explore the theoretical positions, debates, and design issues arising from these different practices. Topics will include the rhetorical, ludic, theatrical, narrative political, and legal dimensions of digital media.

RHETORIC 136, 4 units
Art and Authorship
W.W. Wong

Study of narratives and visual cultures of art and its authors, including questions of what is art, who authors it, the boundaries of works and artistic personae, and how aesthetic, economic, and legal regimes of artistic authorship are historicized.

SOCIOL 166, 4 units
Society and Technology
L. B. Huang

This course studies the interaction between society and technologies in a comparative and multicultural perspective. Some topics covered include the relationship between technology and human society; technology, culture and values; technology in the new global economy; development and inequality; electronic democracy; how technology has transformed work and employment; and the challenges of technological progress and the role that society plays in addressing these challenges.

SOCIOL 167, 4 units
Virtual communities/Social Media
Staff

With the advent of virtual communities and online social networks, old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. Using a variety of online social media simultaneously, and drawing upon theoretical literature in a variety of disciplines, this course delves into discourse about community across disciplines. This course will enable students to establish both theoretical and experiential foundations for making decisions and judgments regarding the relations between mediated communication and human community.

TDPS 26-1, 4 units
Introduction to Performance Studies
A. De Kosnik

Topics vary from semester to semester and have included The Power of Music and Poetry in the Theater; Modern Drama and Theater, 1940 to the Present; Theaters, Tricksters, and Cultural Exchange; Art as Social Action; and The Invisible World (Process Seminar).

TDPS 119-001, 4 units
Performance Theory: Theatrical Modernism
S. Steen

An examination of a theoretical topic or perspective on performance, with specific attention to the interface between theoretical endeavor and dramatic, nondramatic, and nontheatrical modes of performance; may involve visiting artists. Topics vary from semester to semester.

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